Florida Real Estate Properties

Florida Real Estate Properties used to be the most sought properties in the United Stated. Wonderful climate, the second longest coastline in the United States and numerous tourist attractions made Florida one of the major destinations of holiday trips as well as a favorite place for spending one’s retirement. These factors resulted in a steep increase of the real estate sales rate, as more and more people decided to buy properties in the Sun State – either as summer house or places to spend the coming retirement years.

During the last few years, Florida’s popularity drove the real estate properties’ prices to unprecedented heights. This was backed up also by the constantly growing population. Despite the fact that Florida is one of the “balanced” states with the net immigration only a few per cent points higher than emigration, the state’s population is growing very quickly – from roughly 13 million in 1990 to 16 million in 2000 and about 18 million in 2006.

Florida Real Estate Properties: Prices and Trends

What was the Florida real estate market’s greatest strength – the tendency of people throughout the United States to buy second homes there – caused its real estate market to suffer heavy losses during the nationwide real estate industry slowdown. Second homes were among the first properties buyers decided to forget about and there were not enough first-time home buyers to fill out the breach.

As the result the sales rate of Florida real estate properties slumped statewide, in some counties it dropped even as much as 34% between January, 2006 and January, 2007. The prices, however, remained on roughly the same level as before the market slowdown – though there are a few reports indicating that the major (15-20%) price reduction is on its way as we speak. While more and more buyers withdraw, at least temporarily, from the purchases, sellers still intend to try to sell their houses at premium prices. These two factors create the classic from of the buyer’s market.

This trend has been further strengthened by the taxation debate in a few leading Florida counties. Many potential buyers of Florida real estate properties are now holding on the transaction waiting for the decisions concerning the real estate tax cuts before making the foreclosure.

The bottom line

As the market signals are mixed and unclear, the situation on Florida real estate market is currently extremely hard to assess. Most experts however, expect that the Florida real estate market is now hitting the bottom and the properties’ sales rate will begin to increase starting in 2008.

Despite the current problems, most investors and construction companies point that Florida still remains an excellent retirement location. As the generation of baby boomers inevitably enters the retirement age, the Florida real estate properties will be more and more often sold. While many buyers are now postponing the purchases due to high property prices, they have never resigned from Florida as the place to move to for the retirement. As the result, even the smallest price drop may trigger an increase in the Florida real estate properties’ sales rate and end the slowdown. If such thing happens, it will put the whole Florida economy back on its track in a few months, as the construction industry and the consumer goods sector will power up to meet the real estate industry and buyers’ needs.

Rob West is an expert for Real Estate in the United States. He has written several articles about the real estate market. If you want to know more about Florida Real Estate Properties just visit his website.

Economic Turmoil and the Future of Brazil

For many years, Brazil has been an emerging economic hub, attracting investors from all over the world. The Brazilian economy saw an 368% increase in Gross Domestic Product growth from 2003 to 2011. In addition, Brazil took in almost half of Foreign Direct Investment flowing into South America during 2015. This doesn’t come as a surprise since it reigns as one of the major emerging national economies. However, Brazil has seen a recent economic downturn with increasing unemployment and a contracting GDP. In fact, the Brazilian government cut 2017 GDP expectations from 1.6% to 1% growth. Having been one the most lucrative foreign investments for governments to individual investors, what happened to the so-called “Country of the Future” and can Brazil regain its momentum?

Back in 2015, recession hit Brazil hard and the country is still struggling to get back on track. According to the CIA World Factbook, the economy contracted 32% from its peak in 2011 and unemployment reached a new high at 12.6% in 2016. Being based mostly on services, agriculture and oil, Brazil’s economy has a direct correlation with global demand. With global recession looming, Brazil is feeling the effects of a slow world economy.

Brazil is a top tourist destination offering beautiful beaches, a diverse culture and exciting festivals. However, with the world economy slowing down, people are less likely to travel abroad. Since the majority of the country’s GDP derives from the service industry, Brazil will not be able to rebound any time soon unless there is a major boost in consumer confidence.

The demand for Brazilian exports was slashed when its largest trading partner, China, entered into an economic slowdown of their own. The decrease in exports caused massive layoffs throughout the nation. The notorious economic downward spiral began by wary consumer spending as unemployment rose. Companies that tried to gain capital by borrowing in U.S. dollars found it difficult to pay back those loans as the Brazilian Real crashed 25% in the span of a year in 2015.

One of the major hits came from low oil prices and the corruption of Petrobras, a large oil company and Brazil’s largest source of investment. Brazil is major producer of oil, exporting $11.8 billion worth in 2015, according to the Observatory for Economic Complexity. OPEC delivered a major blow when the cartel decided not to cut oil production, causing oil futures prices to plunge. In order to cope with heavy losses, Petrobras was forced to sell off assets and halt future research and expansion plans.

As if things weren’t going poorly, Petrobras was also caught in a scandal with former Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff and other high office executives. From 2004 to 2012, the company had spent over $2 billion on bribes to politicians whom would allow the company to charge inflated prices for construction contracts. Now that the scandal has unfolded, Petrobras executives face jail time and the company as a whole is forced to pay billions in fines.

So what does the future hold for Brazil?

Although at the moment the future looks dim, there are still signs of hope Brazil can turn itself around. The Real has seemed to stabilize in 2016 and heads into 2017 with an upward trend. Moreover, experts’ GDP projections for 2018 through 2020 show promising figures that Brazil can restore pre-recession level growth.

Even more promising, U.S. companies are still showing faith in Brazil’s future. American Airlines plans to invest $100 million in an aircraft maintenance center in Sao Paulo. Brazilian Investment Partnership Minister Wellington Moreira Franco and many countries like the United States, United Kingdom, France and Japan agree there are still reasons to invest in Brazil. This should be seen as a sign of confidence that the Brazilian market will grow soundly with the support of both national and international investment.

4 Benefits of Importing Goods From Overseas 4 Benefits of Importing Goods From Overseas

Any business involved in supplying goods or materials needs to constantly look at ways to increase the efficiency of the supply chain, while also managing costs. A practical solution to improve profit margins is to look to the overseas market for the raw materials. Importing goods can offer a variety of worthwhile benefits, such as high-quality goods, lower prices and a wider range of suppliers. While the opportunity to import goods is great for a lot of businesses, it is still essential to conduct the necessary research to avoid making a costly mistake.

Here are a few benefits related to importing from overseas:

Comparative advantage

A major reason to import relates to comparative advantage and the potential to benefit from the more attractively priced goods. Comparative advantage relates to finding the overseas market with the more favorable production costs, such as lower tax schemes, low labor costs, cheaper raw materials, etc. By cutting the initial investment in materials or products, it makes it that much easier to increase future profits once the items are shipped back and sold in your own country. This makes importing one of the easiest and quickest ways to boost your profit margins and cut costs.

High quality products

Importing goods from countries across the world still mean it is possible to source high-quality products. There are plenty of countries that have their own specialties and strengths. For the business that is looking to buy raw materials or goods from a country that specializes in a particular item, it often pays to buy direct from the source. This means it is possible to get access to the finest materials right at the start of the supply chain which should help to improve all-round quality and hopefully make the end product that much more marketable.

Trade relations

There are plenty of countries that attempt to promote trade relations to make it that much easier to import the desired goods or products necessary for your business. Government agencies may even be set up to help make the entire importing process as straightforward as possible. With the guidance of an official agency in place, the risks of trading with an overseas company are likely to be significantly reduced.

Regional resources

A further benefit is the ability to expand the potential market pool with the choice to buy resources that may only be found in specific regions of the world. This may relate to special technologies or raw materials.